Nepal: What we will miss and what yet stands!

*Beep*

Me: Too busy packing. Can’t wait to board the flight to Nepal.

*Beep* *Beep*

Me: Curses jobless people texting me and interfering with my packing process.

*Beep*

Me: Get’s annoyed. Finally picks up my phone.

“More than 1800 dead as magnitude-7.8 quake rocks Nepal”

Not Nepal!

The earthquake hadn’t just claimed thousands of innocent lives but also some of the spectacular structural beauties that had given it a good share of tourist income!

What we will miss

1) Kathmandu’s Darbar Square was one such architectural marvel that was in the heart of the city. Built in the earlier third century, renovations had erased all traces of the past. This Durbar Square was used by many kings of the Malla and Shah Dynasty as their lair. It was then used as a museum till the natural calamity has now reduced it to rubble.

2) The Kasthamandap too was reduced to almost nothing. This place was a three stories temple, known because of its unique architectural style and because it was home to the statue of the Gorkhanath.

Darbar Square, Kathmandu
Darbar Square, Kathmandu

Image Credits: Wiki

3) Patan, a city of fine arts is famous for its stupas said to be built by King Asoka of the Maurya kingdom. Home to museums and palaces and handicrafts ; the place lost it’s priced possession the Hari Shankar Temple and the Uma Maheshwar Temple.

The complex at Patan
The complex at Patan

Image Credits: Wiki 

4) Dharahara, in Katmandu was a 9 story 61.88meter tall tower. It was built by the Prime Minister, Bhimsen Thapa. It was one the places to go to get a panoramic view of Katmandu.

Bhimsen Tower
Bhimsen Tower

Image Credits: Wiki

Nevertheless, here are some places you can still visit after Nepal is restored and healed.

1) The Nagarkot, a view point from which one can view the Himalayas, Everest, more like. Dhulikhel, another view point to get a glimpse of the magnificent mountains.

2) The Boudhanath Temple, is a stupa located on the outskirts of Kathmandu and is one of the largest stupas. It’s said to have eyes in all four directions and is said to be a route to Tibet.

The Stupa
The Boudhanath Stupa

Image Credits:  “Nepal Kathmandu Boudhanath 1” by Alexander Shafir – Own work.

3) The Pashupathinath Temple, who served as a burial ground after the quake too is standing with all its glory. While some call it luck, other call it a miracle of God. This temple was rebuilt in the 15th century after the previous one was munched on by the termites.

The Pashupathinath Temple
The Pashupathinath Temple

Image Credits: Wiki

Sad things happen to beautiful places. But, who knows, soon, there would be a sighting a new Nepal,  a Nepal that has never been unveiled before. A much bigger and better place than what we all had ever imagined it to be! I, and my folks here at Hoboist, wish for the same.

I walk, and I discover, myself and places. I draw, and I write. And that's how I travel.

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